A longitudinal study of environmental risk factors for subjective symptoms associated with sick building syndrome in new dwellings

Tomoko Takigawa, Bing Ling Wang, Noriko Sakano, Da Hong Wang, Keiki Ogino, Reiko Kishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was performed to explore possible environmental risk factors, including indoor chemicals, mold, and dust mite allergens, which could cause sick building syndrome (SBS)-type symptoms in new houses. The study was conducted in 2004 and 2005 and the final study population consisted of 86 men and 84 women residing in Okayama, Japan. The indoor concentrations of indoor aldehydes, volatile organic compounds, airborne fungi, and dust mite allergens in their living rooms were measured and the longitudinal changes in two consecutive years were calculated. A standardized questionnaire was used concomitantly to gather information on frequency of SBS-type symptoms and lifestyle habits. About 10% of the subjects suffered from SBS in the both years. Crude analyses indicated tendencies for aldehyde levels to increase frequently and markedly in the newly diseased and ongoing SBS groups. Among the chemical factors and molds examined, increases in benzene and in Aspergillus contributed to the occurrence of SBS in the logistic regression model. Indoor chemicals were the main contributors to subjective symptoms associated with SBS. A preventive strategy designed to lower exposure to indoor chemicals may be able to counter the occurrence of SBS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5223-5228
Number of pages6
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume407
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 15 2009

Fingerprint

environmental risk
risk factor
Allergens
Aldehydes
Dust
Volatile Organic Compounds
aldehyde
Aspergillus
mite
Molds
Benzene
Fungi
Volatile organic compounds
Logistics
dust
sick building syndrome
dwelling
lifestyle
benzene
volatile organic compound

Keywords

  • Aldehydes
  • Dust mite allergen
  • Fungi
  • Sick building syndrome
  • Volatile organic compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

A longitudinal study of environmental risk factors for subjective symptoms associated with sick building syndrome in new dwellings. / Takigawa, Tomoko; Wang, Bing Ling; Sakano, Noriko; Wang, Da Hong; Ogino, Keiki; Kishi, Reiko.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 407, No. 19, 15.09.2009, p. 5223-5228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takigawa, Tomoko ; Wang, Bing Ling ; Sakano, Noriko ; Wang, Da Hong ; Ogino, Keiki ; Kishi, Reiko. / A longitudinal study of environmental risk factors for subjective symptoms associated with sick building syndrome in new dwellings. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2009 ; Vol. 407, No. 19. pp. 5223-5228.
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