A human pathogenic bacterial infection model using the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus

Yuto Kochi, Atsushi Miyashita, Kohsuke Tsuchiya, Masao Mitsuyama, Kazuhisa Sekimizu, Chikara Kaito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invertebrate animal species that can withstand temperatures as high as 37°C, the human body temperature, are limited. In the present study, we utilized the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, which lives in tropical and subtropical regions as an animal model of human pathogenic bacterial infection. Injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus into the hemolymph killed crickets. Injected P. aeruginosa or S. aureus proliferated in the hemolymph until the cricket died. The ability of these pathogenic bacteria to kill the crickets was blocked by the administration of antibiotics. S. aureus gene-knockout mutants of virulence factors, including cvfA, agr and srtA, exhibited decreased killing ability compared with the parent strain. The dose at which 50% of crickets were killed by P. aeruginosa or S. aureus was not decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. Injection of Listeria monocytogenes, which upregulates toxin expression at 37°C, killed crickets and the dose at which 50% of crickets were killed was decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. These findings suggest that the two-spotted cricket is a useful model animal for evaluating the virulence properties of various human pathogenic bacteria at variable temperature including 37°C.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberfnw163
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume363
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Gryllus bimaculatus
  • High temperature
  • Invertebrate animal model
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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