A Golgi-localized glycosyltransferase, OsGT14;1, is required for growth of both roots and shoots in rice

Peitong Wang, Naoki Yamaji, Jian Feng Ma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Glycosyltransferases (GTs) form a large family in plants and are important enzymes for the synthesis of various polysaccharides, but only a few members have been functionally characterized. Here, through mutant screening with gene mapping, we found that an Oryza sativa (rice) mutant with a short-root phenotype was caused by a frame-shift mutation of a gene (OsGT14;1) belonging to the glycosyltransferase gene family 14. Further analysis indicated that the mutant also had a brittle culm and produced lower grain yield compared with wild-type rice, but the roots showed similar root structure and function in terms of the uptake of mineral nutrients. OsGT14;1 was broadly expressed in all organs throughout the entire growth period, with a relatively high expression in the roots, stems, node I and husk. Furthermore, OsGT14;1 was expressed in all tissues of these organs. Subcellular observation revealed that OsGT14;1 encoded a Golgi-localized protein. Mutation of OsGT14;1 resulted in decreased cellulose content and increased hemicellulose, but did not alter pectin in the cell wall of roots and shoots. The knockout of OsGT14;1 did not affect the tolerance to toxic mineral elements, including Al, As, Cd and salt stress, but did increase the sensitivity to low pH. Taken together, OsGT14;1 located at the Golgi is required for growth of both roots and shoots in rice through affecting cellulose synthesis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPlant Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • brittle culm
  • cell wall
  • cellulose synthesis
  • glycosyltransferase
  • Oryza sativa
  • rice
  • short root

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology

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