A dosimetric analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with bone marrow sparing for cervical cancer

Naoya Murakami, Hiroyuki Okamoto, Takahiro Kasamatsu, Kazuma Kobayashi, Ken Harada, Mayuka Kitaguchi, Shuhei Sekii, Kana Takahashi, Kotaro Yoshio, Koji Inaba, Madoka Morota, Minako Sumi, Takafumi Toita, Yoshinori Ito, Jun Itami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aim: The purpose of the present study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan with (Bone Marrow Sparing (BMS) - IMRT) or without (normal-IMRT) an intention of avoiding bone marrow in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity. Patients and Methods: Computed tomography (CT) images of 10 consecutive postoperative cervical cancer patients were used. All patients were already treated by normal-IMRT. BMS-IMRTs were created for this study and dose-volume histogram parameters were compared. Results: Both planning target volume (PTV) D95% and D97% were statistically lower in BMS-IMRT than normal-IMRT, however, the difference was lower than 3%. There were no statistical differences between BMS-IMRT and normal-IMRT in the mean value of rectum V30Gy, V50Gy; bladder V45Gy, V50Gy; Bowel V35Gy, and V50Gy. Both in whole pelvic bone (WPB) and inner cavity of pelvic bone (ICPB), the mean value of V10Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy of BMS-IMRT were statistically lower than that of normal-IMRT. Conclusion: Both lower and higher dose for WPB as well as ICPB were effectively lowered by BMS-IMRT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5091-5098
Number of pages8
JournalAnticancer research
Volume34
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bone marrow sparing
  • Cervical cancer
  • IMRT
  • Postoperative radiation therapy
  • Radical hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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