A chimeric protein of aluminum-activated malate transporter generated from wheat and Arabidopsis shows enhanced response to trivalent cations

Takayuki Sasaki, Yoshiyuki Tsuchiya, Michiyo Ariyoshi, Peter R. Ryan, Yoko Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

TaALMT1 from wheat (Triticum aestivum) and AtALMT1 from Arabidopsis thaliana encode aluminum (Al)-activated malate transporters, which confer acid-soil tolerance by releasing malate from roots. Chimeric proteins from TaALMT1 and AtALMT1 (Ta::At, At::Ta) were previously analyzed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Those studies showed that Al could activate malate efflux from the Ta::At chimera but not from At::Ta. Here, functions of TaALMT1, AtALMT1 and the chimeric protein Ta::At were compared in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells. We focused on the sensitivity and specificity of their activation by trivalent cations. The activation of malate efflux by Al was at least two-fold greater in the chimera than the native proteins. All proteins were also activated by lanthanides (erbium, ytterbium, gadolinium, and lanthanum), but the chimera again released more malate than TaALMT1 or AtALMT1. In Xenopus oocytes, Al, ytterbium, and erbium activated inward currents from the native TaALMT1 and the chimeric protein, but gadolinium only activated currents from the chimera. Lanthanum inhibited currents from both proteins. These results demonstrated that function of the chimera protein was altered compared to the native proteins and was more responsive to a range of trivalent cations when expressed in plant cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1427-1435
Number of pages9
JournalBBA - Biomembranes
Volume1858
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • Aluminum-activated malate transporter
  • Chimeric protein
  • Lanthanides
  • Tobacco BY-2 cells
  • Transport function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Biophysics

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