A 38-year (1978–2015) Northern Hemisphere daily snow cover extent product derived using consistent objective criteria from satellite-borne optical sensors

Masahiro Hori, Konosuke Sugiura, Kazufumi Kobayashi, Teruo Aoki, Tomonori Tanikawa, Katsuyuki Kuchiki, Masashi Niwano, Hiroyuki Enomoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A long-term Northern Hemisphere (NH) daily 5-km snow cover extent (SCE) product (JASMES) was developed by the application of a consistent objective snow cover mapping algorithm to data from historical optical sensors on polar orbiting satellites from 1978 to 2015. A conventional decision tree algorithm with multiple threshold tests was employed to analyze radiances for the five spectral bands available across the full analysis period. The accuracies of the analyzed SCE maps were evaluated against in-situ snow data measured at ground stations along with the SCE maps from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Data Record (NOAA-CDR) product. The evaluation showed the JASMES product to have a more temporally stable producer's accuracy (PA; 1–omission error) than NOAA, which is a key factor in the analysis of long-term SCE trends. Comparison of seasonal NH SCE trends from the two products showed NOAA to have opposite trends to those of JASMES in the fall and winter seasons, and to have overestimated SCE decreasing trends in the spring and summer. These tendencies are consistent with the increasing spatial and temporal resolutions of information over time, which were used in generating the NOAA snow analysis. An estimation of unbiased SCEs based on the accuracies of SCE maps also endorses the long-term trends of the JASMES product. The JASMES NH seasonal SCE exhibited negative slopes in all seasons but was only statistically significant in the summer (JJA) and fall (SON). Delayed snow cover onset was observed to be the main driver of decreasing annual snow duration (SCD) trends. The spatial pattern of annual SCD trends exhibited noticeable asymmetry between continents, with the largest significant decreases observed over western Eurasia with relatively few statistically significant decreases over North America.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)402-418
Number of pages17
JournalRemote Sensing of Environment
Volume191
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 2017

Keywords

  • AVHRR
  • Climate
  • Long-term data
  • MODIS
  • Remote sensing
  • Snow cover duration
  • Snow cover extent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Geology
  • Computers in Earth Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A 38-year (1978–2015) Northern Hemisphere daily snow cover extent product derived using consistent objective criteria from satellite-borne optical sensors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this